OutFront live Mon. – Fri. 7p ET

The captain of the sunken ferry in South Korea was formally charged and is in custody, state-run media reported early Saturday, citing prosecutors and police. Erin Burnett has more.
July 6th, 2012
05:10 PM ET

Banning McDonalds, the only food available at the Olympics

A few weeks ago, we reported that McDonalds will be the only branded food available at the 2012 London Olympics. Suffice it to say, McDonalds told us they were "surprised and disappointed" with our comments.

McDonalds wrote to OutFront saying, "choice and variety on our menu, with items like grilled chicken, yogurt, oatmeal, fruit salad, smoothies and wraps. And of course, we're proud of our iconic burgers."

McDonald's says it's offering healthy options at the summer Olympics. But does it add up?

Jenny Jones, London Assembly Member is calling for the Olympics to ban Mcdonalds at this year's games and Katherine Mangu-Ward, Managing Editor, Reason Magazine come OutFront.

Recommended:

McDonalds' healthy options at the Olympics

McDonalds' Olympic plans


Filed under: 2012 Olympics • Health
soundoff (7 Responses)
  1. Barb Szubinska

    MacDonalds promoting exercise? Really? Can you do a follow up explaining how much exercise one would need to do to burn off some of those calories, say 2000 of them? Walk twenty miles, or swim for 5 hours? How many people who attend the games and eat exclusively MC are going to do that much exercise?

    As for the golden arches logo not compelling people to buy the food? If the logo was not doing it, companies would never cared to pay for having their logos on anything.

    July 8, 2012 at 8:53 pm | Reply
  2. Gatsby

    What a non issue. Why do we have to ban certain kinds of food or purveyors of food? Let people eat what they want, where they want. If they get diabeetus then that's the consequence of their poor choices, but let them make that choice.

    July 7, 2012 at 7:51 pm | Reply
  3. Joey at Purdue Univ

    I've seen the ingredients to the McRib, they got one element that's used in yoga mats. Heck, if you get some charcoal, some pork chops, grill seasoning, some Sweet Baby Ray's, and about an hour to grill it, you could put together a sandwich that'd put the McRib to shame.

    July 7, 2012 at 8:58 am | Reply
  4. amber

    People are not forced to eat Mcdonalds and they can choose healthy food from Mcdonalds. I also believe that if people would exercise then they would burn of the junk food they do eat. America is just becoming lazy. It doesn't help that people keep inventing stuff to make our life easier, I appreciate some of the stuff but other people expect to have everything done for them and sit and eat junk food and they wonder why they are fat,

    July 7, 2012 at 2:49 am | Reply
  5. Peter

    McDonald's is not all bad....they did build the Swimming Stadium for the Los Angeles Olympics. Not bad at all.

    July 6, 2012 at 11:39 pm | Reply
  6. Bonnie Modugno, MS, RD

    What is Jenny Jones talking about?

    "The Village includes shops, restaurants and medical, media and leisure facilities, while a dining hall will cater for 5,500 athletes at a time."

    http://www.londontown.com/LondonInformation/London-Olympics/London-2012-Olympic-Village/69477/

    I can only wonder at her ulterior motive. Does she propose to ban any source of food that has options with "too much salt, sugar and fat"? There would be very few places left to purchase prepared food, much less the raw ingredients. This is what happens when people either don't understand the limitations of science or get seduced by an illusion of control.

    July 6, 2012 at 8:50 pm | Reply
  7. Yvon M.

    Erin, if I were to go to the olympics I might just go for a day or week. In that one day or week if I'm in a diet, I know what my calorie intake is per day. What I would do is to track my calories and be very selective of what I can and cannot eat. I have been tracking what I eat for six months and I have gone to McDonald's. I have been able to lose 35 lbs.

    July 6, 2012 at 8:00 pm | Reply

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.