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August 22nd, 2014
08:55 PM ET

How are cops trained for deadly force?

Nearly two weeks since the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown, many questions remain about what happened the day Brown was killed.

Officials say a shot was fired inside the officer's police car and Brown was found dead 35 feet from Wilson's police car.

Michael Brown autopsies: Will they answer the critical questions?

But how does that distance factor into a police officer's decision to shoot?

CNN's Kyung Lah is OutFront.


Filed under: Law enforcement • Michael Brown
soundoff (5 Responses)
  1. Dave

    Would it just make more sense to stop blaming the officer for the actions of the suspect. The suspects actions are what is getting them killed. They make the choice to try to harm or kill the officer. The ball is in their court and when they lose, the police officer is to blame.

    September 9, 2014 at 10:33 am | Reply
  2. Nicky Jackson

    Nice propaganda piece for Martinelli's business. CNN has become Fox "light." I can't believe you folks swallowed that crap.

    Try getting a more balanced police policy and procedure's expert next time. Okay? This was so fake it isn't funny...

    September 1, 2014 at 4:42 am | Reply
    • Dr. Ron Martinelli

      As the forensic police practices expert who was contacted by CNN to discuss and demonstrate the "21 Foot Rule" concept, I would like tor respond to Ms. Jackson's comments. Human factors and psychophysiology is peer reviewed science and not "crap." Research like CNN portrayed in their news segment is not "faked." It is shown in "real time." Police officers are humans and will ultimately respond as normal human being will under compressed periods of intense stress. Our research clearly shows this. You simply just discount applied science when it's staring you in the face in "real time" video. Ms. Jackson's comments provide insult, without substance. Perhaps she would like to share with us her education, expertise and experience in police work, use of force, and human factors applied science in her next response to this discussion? As a retired officer who has actually been in an officer-involved shooting and countless other high-risk, CQC encounters (and like many of you officers out there), I truly understand the importance and appreciate the value of officer safety training and the introduction of applied science concepts in keeping officers and citizens safer. Perhaps Ms. Jackson would also like to share her "woulda-shoulda-coulda" speculative theories on what officers should do when faced with a rapidly moving, engaging armed threat? Perhaps we just just shooting the knife out of their hands? Maybe shoot to wound? Perhaps run away? On the other hand, perhaps the eloquent Ms. Jackson would have us simply swallow the collective, speculative, non-forensic BS of media pundits and community activists who opine critically against officers daily, ignoring the weekly looses of law enforcement officers from armed, psychotic, drug-influenced and/or criminally intent violent suspects while those officers place the lives of people like Ms. Jackson ahead of their own when protecting their communities. Perhaps Ms. Jackson would like to explain to us what SHE would do if she was armed and suddenly attacked by an armed assailant from a distance of 30 feet or less and who was focused upon killing her? Wel, I'm waiting for that response..... Your turn Ms. Jackson.

      October 29, 2014 at 2:41 pm | Reply
  3. Randy Tuders

    I did a study when I was Teaching DT at ICE. I FOUND THAT A MORE EFFECTIVE DISTACE WAS AROUND 30-35 FT. WITH A WELL TRAINED POLICE OFFICER 21 FT IS DOABLE, BUT AVERAGE OFFICER WILL BE INJURED.

    August 29, 2014 at 5:21 pm | Reply
  4. Tim Johnson

    When all the facts come to light then we can start doing the analysis.
    FYI, most gun battles occur within 6 feet or less of each other and there is only a 25 or 30 % hit rate. Adrenelin is flowing and most training goes out the window. It is all reflex and pull the trigger just as fast as you can and hope to be lucky. Brown was stupid and arrogant, thinking he could bully the cop like he did everyone else. Luckily the training DID kick in and we have an officer who went home to his family after his visit to the hospital. We can only hope there was no permanent damage to his eye. BTW, Brown was a teen only in age. He was full grown adult based on his actions.

    August 26, 2014 at 9:10 pm | Reply

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