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May 28th, 2014
08:12 PM ET

Quest: Google's self-driving car is the "future"

The latest version of the self driving car from Google has no steering wheel and no pedals.

Google's new self-driving car has no steering wheel or brake

And it's tiny - room for only two people.

But it's electric, which means drivers have to completely rely on the vehicle's sensors to get around safely -  though there is a stop button. Just in case.

OutFront, Richard Quest is host of Quest Means Business.


Filed under: Google • News • Tech
February 12th, 2014
08:31 PM ET

Is Google to blame for the income gap?

Comedian John Oliver is the latest to take a jab at Google for creating what some in San Francisco say is a painful divide between the haves and the have-nots.

On Tuesday, he took issue with a topic that OutFront has reported on - the plush and private shuttle buses being used to transport Google and other tech workers from San Francisco to their offices in Silicon Valley.

“You’re no longer the underdog!” Oliver exclaimed. He pointed out, the tech community in San Francisco is “pissing off an entire city – not just with what you do at work, but how you get to work!”

Oliver also went after the high salaries paid to the tech employees, which have caused rent prices to skyrocket.

“You’re accused of over-gentrifying a city that was already the most expensive city to live in," Oliver said.

Is all this Google-bashing fair?

Mediaite's Joe Concha is OutFront.


Filed under: Google • Income Inequality • News • Tech
February 4th, 2014
08:54 PM ET

Google's shuttle buses draw ire of Bay area protesters

Bay area residents are protesting Google commuters, specifically the shuttle buses that transport their workers from San Francisco to Google's offices in Silicon Valley.

Google bus stunt reveals tensions in San Francisco

Why are San Francisco residents so angry about these shuttles?

Offered as a free employee perk by Google, Facebook, Apple, Yahoo and other companies, the large buses have become a symbol of income inequality here and a lightning rod for resentment.

Critics say young well-paid tech workers are taking up a disproportionate share of the bay area housing and driving up already astronomical real estate prices.

Rent increases in San Francisco are outpacing the nation. The average price is more than $3,000 per month.

CNN's Dan Simon has the story OutFront.


Filed under: Google • News • Tech